• A Veterans View On Why Don’t Ask Don’t Tell Works!
  • To: Secretary Gates
  • Date: April 15, 2011
  • Topic: Don't Ask Don't Tell
  • Category: Don't Ask Don't Tell, Military Policy, Secretary Gates
  • Subcategory: Military Policy, Secretary Gates
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Dear Secretary Gates,


My name is Gene, I am a 31-year-old Iraq Veteran. I served 10 years as a U.S. Army combat medic from 1998 to 2008. After spending four years on active duty, I joined the National Guard. I went into Iraq feeling that our invasion was immoral, but as a medic I felt a strong sense of duty to deploy with my fellow soldiers. My stated mission as Army medical corps is "to conserve the fighting strength," and that is what I did. My job as a medic was to ensure the health and combat readiness of each and every soldier under my care, no matter what. And it is my sincere hope that all Army medical corps would abide by that same mission. That is why I am writing.

I am writing in support of Don’t Ask Don’t Tell measure. Even though I believe on the one hand that the ban on gays serving openly in the military is unconstitutional, I do believe strongly that the ban is in place for a good reason: Don't ask, don't tell is a policy that has worked.

Not only does it allows gays to serve in the military, but it prevents elevating a soldier's sexual preference above his mission accomplishment and what is best for the military. Today, a gay, male soldier can receive the Medal of Honor, he can reach the rank of general and serve in any military occupation he is qualified for. There are no restrictions placed upon him, other than the fact that he cannot announce his homosexuality.

Can you imagine what would happen if repeal would occur? I can tell you first hand that soldiers and Marines will want separate shower facilities and different berthing. They might even quit the service. It is my belief that some lessons are learned better in defeat. As a Hispanic man I can tell you better than anyone that the rights of minorities in this country have never come easy. But you take what you can get.

Gays should not be allowed to serve openly in the military that is all there is to it. As a medic who has served ten long years, I am asking you to please not make the mistake of reversing a ban that has been in place for a good reason. If it's not broke, don't fix it! I trust that you are a good man and will withhold the honor and dignity of American soldiers everywhere.

Thank you very much for your time Sir,

Sincerely,

Gene

 

4 Endorsements
4 Oppositions
1 Comments

Conserving the fighting strength. This is what "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" is all about. Conserving the cohesiveness of a fighting unit in combat. Repealing this policy because of purely political considerations is not only wrong, it is dangerous to the men and women who are in combat. Thank you for your letter, Gene. I so appreciate a veteran standing up for what is right.

Endorsed by: jdf7376, 08.02.11 0 0

thank you for your service. how would you feel if you had to denounce you latin herritage? As much as I appreciate your view, you are not currently on active service, Let the active service troops decide, and they have, and except for a handful of Marines and some really old career military the troops decided that it was time to move on from DADT.

Opposed by: Ben Richards, 07.02.11 0 1

This is well-thought out and not attacking gays at all, and I thank you for that. But as a fellow Latina, I disagree. When it comes to rights for minorities, don't tell me to settle for what I can get. I demand equal treatment, complete and whole, for myself and for other minorities. There are, in fact, too many restrictions on gay soldiers. I have watched my friends endure them. Yes, it will be hard to change, but usually the hard thing to do is the right thing to do.

Opposed by: GnuMom10, 07.02.11 Replies (1)    |     0 1

AGREED!!!

Endorsed by: lyndsie121, 06.29.11 1 1

Endorsed by: vickij1998, 06.28.11 0 1

thoughtful letter. thank you for sharing your experience as an army medic.

Commented by: Anonymous, 04.26.11 2 0

Endorsed by: johnsmith, 04.26.11 0 0

test oppose

Opposed by: Kray Te, 04.21.11 0 0

Not so sure I agree with you here. Why can't a soldier be a good soldier and be true to who he is at the same time? According to what you're saying here, a soldier needs to live a lie in order to withhold his honor? Makes no sense at all...

Opposed by: Anonymous, 04.21.11 Replies (1)    |     1 1
Open Letter By
Gene L. Sancho
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Most Endorsed Comment

"thoughtful letter. thank you for sharing your experience as an army medic."

0 Replies - Go to Comment
Most Opposed Comment

"This is well-thought out and not attacking gays at all, and I thank you for that. But as a fellow Latina, I disagree. When it comes to rights for minorities, don't tell me to settle for what I can get. I demand equal treatment, complete and whole, for myself and for other minorities. There are, in fact, too many restrictions on gay soldiers. I have watched my friends endure them. Yes, it will be hard to change, but usually the hard thing to do is the right thing to do."

1 Replies - Go to Comment